itswallie:

 #that took me a second to get #this is a very involved joke

(via mscoolcat)

5 days ago 205,597 notes

reillybrown:

Found this Psylocke commission I did at a con last year.  Thought you guys would like it.

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5 days ago 103 notes

devoureth:

A most excellent lesson in self-defense à la Agent Gracie Hart.

(via slightlypsychicparade)

5 days ago 112,876 notes

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5 days ago 4,057 notes

comicbookwomen:

Bruce Timm

(gallery)

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5 days ago 271 notes

bostonianresolution:

By PAIGE SUTHERLAND

Associated Press


BOSTON — After the twin bombings at the Boston Marathon last April, mourners began leaving thousands of items at a makeshift memorial near the finish line to honor the victims of the attacks.

Some left teddy bears, signs and marathon bibs while others draped running sneakers to commemorate the 3 people killed and more than 260 injured during the April 15 attacks. A cross was set up for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer fatally shot three days later amid a search for the bombing suspects.

To mark the anniversary of the bombings, the material will be curated into an exhibit called “Dear Boston: Messages from the Marathon Memorial.” It will be hosted by the Boston Public Library now through May 11.

Among the numerous heartfelt messages left at Copley Square was one from a Sandy Hook mother that reads, “We understand. Sending love and support.” Other notes urged resilience: “Don’t let this stop you. Stay Boston Strong” and “We will run again.”

One colorful sign had more than 10 towns in Massachusetts forming the shape of a heart, saying “Stands with Boston!!!” underneath. And multiple messages of “I love my city” and “Boston Strong” memorabilia were scattered throughout the square.

Messages were sent from across the world, including Israel, South Korea, Turkey and Venezuela.

But the long-term home for these artifacts is still in flux. Until then, any paper tributes will be held in the Boston archives and the other artifacts will be kept in storage.

An online catalog called “Our Marathon” is hosted by Northeastern University and features 18,000 cards addressed to the mayor’s office. Photos of other objects that can’t be scanned will also be included. The city has also lent out a few of the items for exhibits at the Cambridge Public Library, Northeastern University and the mayor’s office.

John McColgan of the City of Boston Archives said collecting and preserving the material was a collaborative effort. Various companies helped by fumigating, gathering and storing the material at no charge, he said.

One volunteer, Kevin Brown, trekked almost two hours from his home in Brockton to the memorial site for a month to help maintain the grounds and protect the memorabilia by sweeping and putting up tarps when it rained.

“Boston needed a place to heal and someone had to do it,” said the 59-year-old Brown, who stayed at the memorial from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. “It just became a piece of me, and I loved to do it.”

Brown, a self-employed carpenter, constructed the cross for the fallen MIT police officer.

“I did all this for the people of Boston,” he said. “I just love this city.”

Rainey Tisdale, an independent curator from Boston, has been in charge of assembling this year’s exhibit and selecting which items to choose.

She said the experience has been emotional.

“Seeing these objects is a pretty intense experience,” Tisdale said. “People poured their hearts out into them.”

Her work isn’t done yet, but she expects the finished exhibit to feature hundreds of items, including 150 pairs of running shoes.

The centerpiece of the memorial will be four white crosses commemorating those killed: 8-year-old Martin Richard; 23-year-old Lu Lingzi, a Boston University graduate student from China; 29-year-old Krystle Campbell, of Arlington; and 26-year-old MIT officer Sean Collier.

“Working with this collection has taught me that while there’s a lot of pain and sadness in this world, there’s also a lot of love and hope,” Tisdale said. “I’m working hard to focus on the love and hope, and come April I hope my fellow Bostonians will do the same.”

5 days ago 53 notes

fierceisnotenough:

erincutlah:

rurone:

Some people might feel sorry for themselves in this situation

Puppy don’t care

Puppy’s got stuff to do

Puppy’s got places to be

Oh my god…..

(via goatfury)

1 week ago 379,544 notes

She’s a soul on fire.

(via stilesgame)

1 week ago 2,497 notes

(via plumkat)

1 week ago 163,170 notes

# it’s a movie about five people in detention and the scenerio never changes   # but it’s fucking brilliant   # a good script is what makes a good movie   # not millions of dollars on special effects  

(via lumpyyspacebitch)

1 week ago 144,025 notes

beingmeli:

Her face is just like ‘you know it bitch’

(via lumpyyspacebitch)

1 week ago 153,312 notes

dontworryitsharmony:

sweetmickeymerch:

Coming up with schemes with your best friend

Was this movie even real

(via thatgirllsamm)

1 week ago 145,158 notes

"My first hysterectomy as a resident was on a 16-year-old who had an illegal abortion. Her pelvis was nothing but pus. That’s the sort of thing we saw all the time. I admitted about two or three women like this every night. That’s what we’re headed towards now. We’re heading back to those days. Because of the restrictions lawmakers impose, women will seek abortions illegally, and we’re going to see a rise in septic abortions."

-

A Texas OB/GYN Details the Horrific Consequences of Abortion Restrictions

(via whitegirlpolitickin)

(via mscoolcat)

1 week ago 3,771 notes

n0-sudden-revelations:

flatbear:

tickling-your-man-boobies:

dudewheresmycat:

give me the reasons not to reblog this.

they don’t exist

You don’t see many Mumford and Sons gifsets. This is really cool.

YOU DON’T SEE MANY MUMFORD AND SONS GIFSETS

(via slightlypsychicparade)

1 week ago 511,203 notes
11th
April
7,855 notes
Reblog

(via lets-get-fuckedup-and-die)

1 week ago 7,855 notes